Eternally Important Leadership

by Kevin Ingram 

September 11, 2001 is a day that, if we are old enough to remember its events, we will likely never forget. I remember it vividly. I was at work at Manhattan Christian College when my wife called and told me I needed to find a TV because a plane had just hit one of the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York.

I immediately went to our Campus Center and turned on a TV – just in time to witness the second plane hitting the second tower. I knew at that point it wasn’t an accident, it was intentional. America was under attack.

The saga continued to quickly unfold as a third flight targeted and struck the south side of the Pentagon and shortly thereafter, a fourth plane crashed in Pennsylvania after the passengers attacked that plane’s hijackers. The twin towers eventually collapsed and thousands of innocent lives were taken that day.

Although deeply shaken by the events, I continued through my day. While checking my email later in the morning I received a reminder about our elders’ meeting that night at church; I was scheduled to provide the devotion to begin our meeting.

I kept up to date on the breaking news. Reports on President Bush’s activity that day followed him from the elementary school in Sarasota, Florida where he was informed about the attacks, to military bases in Louisiana and Nebraska, and later returning to Washington DC. The news reported the President’s day would end in a meeting with the National Security Council. That meeting happened to coincide with our elders’ meeting in Manhattan, KS.

With the magnitude of the days’ events swirling through my mind, I thought about our elders’ meeting that night and how thankful I was to be in that meeting, and not in any of the weighty meetings happening in DC. I couldn’t imagine the depth of decisions that had been and were about to be made in response to such a terrible tragedy in America’s history.

As my mind shifted back and forth between the two settings, mindful of the kinds of agendas each group of leaders had before them, it hit me. The meetings in DC were very important; the National Security Council was discussing our nation’s security and the physical safety of the citizens of the United States and their decisions that night would have implications many years into the future. But the agenda for our elders’ meeting involved discussing the mission of our church and the spiritual safety of people’s souls. It sunk in quickly. Meetings in DC were important to protect physical lives. Our meeting in Manhattan, KS involved eternity.

As our elders’ meeting began, I shared the magnitude of our purpose that night. As shepherds of God’s flock among us in Manhattan, Kansas, we had decisions to make that involved people’s souls. Decisions made then and there didn’t just affect lives for days or years, but for all eternity. I reminded my fellow elders of the importance of our role as servants to the congregation. While we might not want to be a part of any meeting like those held in DC, the meeting we were in was, ultimately, more important.

The bottom-line reminder for me was the role of an elder is eternally important and must be taken seriously. Every elder must serve remembering the charge Paul gave to the Ephesian elders in Acts 20:28, “Be on guard for yourselves and for all the flock, among which the Holy Spirit has made you overseers, to shepherd the church of God which He purchased with His own blood.” People’s souls are worthy of Jesus’ sacrifice, and ours as well!

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